Web Technology Purchasing Requirements

Evaluating Accessibility of Products

Accessibility to people with disabilities is a required feature of a purchased product. Accessibility of a product will be evaluated based on responses to the Accessibility Requirements Checklist, given below, that is included as part of the RFP of the purchase. Products that meet the accessibility requirements or have a commitment to meet both the required and desired accessibility features will be given priority over proposals that do not meet the requirements or do not state an interest to meet the requirements in future releases of the product or service. If your products currently do not meet the accessibility requirements, you are still encouraged to submit a proposal if you state a commitment and schedule to include the requirements in future releases.

These requirements are based on the United States Federal Section 508 Information Technology Accessibility Standards and W3C Web Content Accessibility Guidelines 1.0 Double-A web accessibility requirements.

The following are additional resources that are helpful for evaluating accessibility of web resources:

1Priority

Priority identifies a required feature from a feature that is highly desired.

2Response Code

The following table of codes must be used in responding to this RFP:

3Comments

Comments should be used provide more detailed description of accessibility features for the each requirement. For example first version feature appeared, testing with people with disabilities, participaiton in accessibility standards groups, and etc..

Web Technologies Purchasing Requirements Checklist
Ref Description Priority1 Response Code2 Comments3

Standards

S.1

Use Technologies that Support Accessibility

Resources are created and designed using HTML, xhtml, css, mathml, SMIL, SVG and other open standards with features to support accessibility by people with disabilities. The W3C Web Content Accessibility Guidelines 2.0 provides the features that should be part of an accesible markup language.

R

S.2

Avoid Technologies with Poor Accessibility Support

Adobe Flash and other proprietary web development languages that have limited accessibility features are not used for primary content and if included are only included as equivalents to resources that are accessible. The primary interface is the accessible interface and non-accessible version(s) can be selected by user action or configuration.

R

S.3

Content Language

The default language of the resource is included in the markup.

D

S.4

Valid Markup

Resources validate to specifications to improve interoperability, examples include HTML, xhtml, CSS, SMIL, SVG and MathML

D

HTML Navigation

N.1

Unique Titles

Each resource in a website has a unique title that is easily identifable by assistive technoogies, for HTML this means using the title and h1 elements. Web applications must update the title information to reflect the current state and changes in task of the web application.

R

N.2

Headings

All major/minor topics have section headers, for HTML this means using properly nested h2-h6 elements within the web page. The section heading text provides useful orientation information to the content and features on the page. Web applications should update headers to reflect the current state and changes in content and task. Note: For HTML heading markup should not be used to only stylize text and the heading h1 is reserved for titling the resource.

R

N.3

Link Text

Link text is descriptive of the target of the link. The same link text is not used to point to different URIs and references to the same URI use the same link text. Note: Common link problems include "click here", "more" and other link text that assumes content of the link from the surrounding content.

R

N.4

Image Maps

HTML image maps (client and server side) have redundant text links, since graphical browsers do not provide a means to render alt text for area element and server side image maps do not provide the browser with any link information. Redundent text links can be styled to the users perceptual needs.

R

N.5

Navigation Bars and Menus

Navigation bars and menus within web resources use ul and li elements as markup for the list of options and provide a title for the navigation bar with an h2element or other header. Header may be hidden using CSS techniques.

R

N.6

Form Control Labels and Grouping

All HTML form controls (input, select, button andtextarea elements) have an effective label element associated with each control to identify the purpose of the form control in the resource, usually using the label element. Groups of related form controls must use headings or fieldset and legend elements to indicate the relationship of the controls within the group.

R

N.7

Language Changes

Changes in content language are indicated in markup using lang or xml:lang attributes.

R

N.8

Data Tables

Data tables use caption element to title the data table, summary attribute to provide a summary of why the table was included in the resources, th elements for indicating header cells, th.id attribute to uniquely identify each header cell and td.headers attributes indicate header cells associated with each data cell. The axis element maybe used to provide supplementary relationship information.

R

N.9

Lists

Lists of items are markup using unorder lists (ul element), order lists (ol element) or definition list (dl element).

R

N.10

Linearization

When table markup or CSS coding for spatial layout is removed, the document reading order makes sense and is still usable.

R

N.11

Frames

Frames need to provide a descriptive title for each frame to understand the purpose of the frame within a web page using the title attribute. Frames used for client/server interaction or frames that do not contain viewable content and marked as title='hidden'. In general frames cause accessibility problems and should be avoided.

R

HTML Text Equivalents

E.1

Provide Text Equivalents for Images

Images within each web resource have text equivalents. Images are used for a variety of purposes within web resources, so the type of text equivalent is dependent on how the image is being used.

Stylistic or Positioning Images
The alt attribute should be set to null alt="
Stylistic and positioning images should be moved to CSS to improve interoperability
Logos and Supporting Images
The alt attribute should be used to provide the name of the organization or provide short title for the image
Images used as Links
The alt attribute should be used to indicate the target of the link
Informative Images
The alt attribute should be used to give the image a short title to help people understand the content of the image
A longer description, ideally as part of the resource narrative, describing the features of the image should be included.
Charts and graphs should use data tables or list markup to provide numerical summaries and provide the data used to generate the chart.
Math Equations
Equations should also be available in MathML format.

R

E.2

Provide Equivalents for other Graphical or Programmatic Objects

Other types of embedded media for graphics, audio or video objects have text descriptions so people with disabilities know what information they are not able to access, regardless of the accessibility of the object. This is important for reporting accessibility problems to content providers or requesting information be a provided in an accessible format.

R

HTML Styling

Y.1

Text Styling

D

Y.2

Link Styling

D

Y.2

Color Coding

Color cannot be the only means to convey information. When color styling is changed or the content is rendered in black and white the content of the page can still be understood.

R

Y.3

Color Coding

R

Y.5

Styling Text

Images are not used to stylize text, except in logos and other branding images.

R

Y.6

Inline Styling

All content is styled through Style sheets, no in-line styling elements of content (i.e. B, I, FONT, CENTER, BLINK, MARQUEE, ...).

D

Y.7

Focus Styling

Dynamic pseudo-classes like :hover, have corresponding :focus dynamic pseudo-class selectors.

D

Y.2

Layout Tables

CSS should be used in place of tables for the layout of content on a web page. When tables are nested to create styling effects the

D

HTML Scripting and Web Applications

R.1

Keyboard Operation

All functions and tasks of a web resource can be completed using only keyboard commands.

R

R.2

Dynamic Menus

Dynamic and popup menus are created using ul and li and CSS techniques for rendering menu content and links, rather than using scripting to insert, delete and position menu items by manipulating the Document Object Model. Scripting is primarily used to emulate CSS techniques that are not directly supported by browsers like Microsoft Internet Explorer 6.0 for hiding and positioning links in the dynamic menu.

R

R.3

Keyboard Shortcuts

Frequently used functions have keyboard shortcuts. Keyboard shortcuts can be easily enabled or disabled by the user through a configuration setting or link on the web resource. Once keyboard shortcuts are enabled or disabled they remain in that state until the end of the current session or until the user changes the state. Keyboard shortcuts are part of the documentation of the resource.

R

R.4

Configure Keyboard Shortcuts

User is able to configure the keyboard shortcut for frequently used functions through a persistent configuration option.

D

R.4

onChange Events

onChangeevent handler on select elementsdo not cause a page reload or new resource to be loaded.

R

R.5

Animations

Animations and other automatically sequenced changes in content can be paused and restarted under user control.

R

R.6

Flickering

No content on the resource causes flickering between 2-55 Hz.

R

R.7

Dynamic Content

Dynamically generated or changing content has been tested with screen reader technology to make sure that it can be accessed with speech and refreshable Braille technologies.

R

R.8

Embedded Objects

Applications provide an accessible alternative for embedded Java Applets, Flash and other applets and objectss

R

Multimedia

M.1

Text Transcripts

Text transcript of audio, video+audio and other multimedia that include sound are available

R

M.2

Captioning

Text transcript video+audio and other multimedia with visual and auditory renderings are synchronized with visual rendering

R

M.3

External Player

Provides link to play multi-media content in external multimedia players.

R

M.4

Audio Descriptions of Video

Audio descriptions of visual events on video that is important to understanding the information in the video.

D

Adobe PDF

A.1

Tagged PDF

Support the use of tagged PDF for compatibility with assistive technologies.

R

A.2

Text Equivalents

Text equivalents for image for all image objects in the PDF file.

R

A.3

Bookmarks

Bookmarks should be set to major sections with in the PDF document.

R

A.4

Reading Order

Tagged PDF reading order makes sense and represents visual document structure.

R

A.5

Forms

Forms have labels and the tab order between form elements makes logical sense.

R

Commitment to Accessible Design

C.1

Participate in W3C WAI

How many employees participate in activities related to the W3C Web Accessibility Initiative?

D

C.2

Participate in Section 508

Howmany employess participate in the web accessibility sub group of the Telecommunications and Electronic and Information Technology Advisory Committee to the United States Access Board?

D

C.3

Accessibility Design Specification

Does your comapnay have accessibility design specifications and are adherance to these specifications tested as part of the quality assurance process?

D

C.4

User Testing with People with Disabilities

Are people with disabilities including in usability and accessibility testing of products?

D

C.5

Employment of People with Disabilities

How many people with disabilities does your company employ in design, development, sales and/or administration?

D