Requirement Checklist Information

1Priority

Priority distinguishes a required feature from a feature that is highly desired.

2Response Code

The following table of codes must be used in responding to this checklist:

3Comments

Comments should be used provide more detailed description of accessibility features for the each requirement.

Examples: first version feature appeared, testing with people with disabilities, participaiton in accessibility standards groups, etc

Illinois Information Technology Accessibility Standards1.0
Ref Description Priority1 Response Code2 Comments3

1. Coding

1.1 Use valid, standard web programming code.

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Each page must include a DOCTYPE declaration to facilitate rendering and validation. R

The character encoding of each page should be specified within the value of the content attribute (using charset=) on a meta element that also includes an http-equiv attribute set to "content-type". R

1.2 Use appropriate markup to convey document structure.

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The font and center elements must not be used for text styling, instead use structural markup should be used with CSS for styling. R

The b element must not be used to bold text content, instead use heading (h1-h6) elements for heading text or the strong element for emphasizing words, phrases or sentences. R

The i element must not be used to italicize text content, instead use heading (h1-h6) elements for heading text or the em element for emphasizing words, phrases or sentences. R

The u element must not be used to underline text content, instead use heading (h1-h6) elements for heading text or the em or strong element for emphasizing words, phrases or sentences. R

Use CSS properties instead of tables and nested tables to visually layout blocks of related content for graphical renderings. CSS based layout designs support a wider range of rendering technologies (interoperability) than table based designs. People with disabilities use a wider range of technologies than the general population to access the web and the use of CSS helps insure that their technologies will be compatible with the page. R

Each img element with an empty alt attribute should be removed; CSS techniques should be used provide the graphical styling. R

Each img element with width or height less than 8 pixels should be removed; CSS techniques should be used instead to provide the graphical styling. R

Each area element must have an alt attribute. R

1.3 Provide meaningful page titles.

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The page must contain exactly one title element. R

The title element must contain text content R

The last h1 element content for pages within the same domain should be unique. D

The first 60 characters of title element content for pages within the same domain should be unique. R

1.4 Use headings to introduce sections and sub-sections, and use them in the correct order.

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The page must contain at least one h1 element. R

The h1 element must contain text content. R

The page should contain no more than two h1 elements. D

Heading elements that follow the last h1 must be properly nested. R

All subheadings (h2...h6) must contain text content. R

The text content of headings of the same level within the same section should be unique. D

The text content of headings should be concise (less than 65 characters). D

The h2 element or another heading element must precede ul and ol elements that appear to be navigation bars. R

The h2 element or another heading element must precede map elements containing area elements that appear to be a navigation bars. R

1.5 Use lists to identify series of related items, including navigation menus.

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Most pages should contain at least one navigation bar. D

If consecutive p elements include a string of non-space characters followed by a period or right paranthesis character (")"), the markup may be representing an ordered list of items. If the markup is representing an ordered or other type of list, it should use HTML list markup with CSS for styling. R

If consecutive p elements contain an img element with the alt attribute content that includes a single character or the null content, it may be representing a bulleted list of items. If the markup is representing a bulleted or other type of list, it should use HTML list markup and CSS, for incorporating the custom bullet. R

Nested lists deeper than 5 levels are difficult for people to understand, especially screen reader users. Reorganize the structure of the nested lists into sections that can be identified using meaningful section titles using heading markup. D

2. Text

2.1 Use text to display text, unless formatting that cannot be achieved with CSS is required.

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The text content of the h1 element should match all or part of the text content of the title element. R

The text content of an h1 element should not only come from the alt attribute of img elements. R

The text content of an subheading element (h2-h6) should not only come from the alt attribute value of img elements. R

2.2 Use relative sizes for fonts.

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2.3 Identify the language of text.

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Each page must have a lang attribute on its html element whose value is a valid two-character language code. R

If there is text content within a page that is different than the default language of the page, the lang attribute must be used on a container element for the text content and the value of the lang attribute must be set to the language of the content. R

2.4 Use images instead of "ASCII art."

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3. Colors

3.1 Do not convey information with color alone.

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Information cannot be represented by color alone, there needs to be a text or text equivalent for the information. R

3.2 Use contrasting foreground and background colors.

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Text content foreground and background colors of text must have sufficient color contrast to be readible by people with visual impairments. R

4. Images

4.1 Provide "alternate text" for all images.

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For links that include an img element and text content, the alt attribute content of the img element should not repeat the text content of the link. Images that are the used as icons to help users identify the purpose of a link should have their alt attribute set to empty or be included in the graphical rendering as a CSS background image. D

Every img element must have alt attribute. R

If the content of the alt attribute is not empty, it should contain at least 7 characters and less than 90 characters. The text should provide people who cannot see the image with an orientation to the content and the purpose of the image in the web resource. R

The alt attribute content should not include file name of the image. R

The alt attribute content should not include information that is redundant with the img element. R

4.2 Provide full descriptions for graphs, diagrams, and other meaningful images.

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5. Image Maps

5.1 Provide alternate text for each area in client-side image maps.

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Each area element should have a redundant text link (a element) with href values matching the href values of the area elements. D

5.2 Use client-side image maps instead of server-side image maps unless areas cannot be defined with available shapes.

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6. Sounds

6.1 Do not convey information with sound alone.

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6.2 Do not automatically play audio.

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Video, audio and Flash Media objects must not automatically play sound when the page is loaded. R

6.3 Provide text transcripts for audio containing speech when it is provided to the public and/or required to be viewed by employees.

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Video, audio and Flash Media objects must have synchronized text captions or text transcripts. R

7. Multiple

7.1 Provide synchronized captions for all multimedia that contains essential auditory information when it is provided to the public and/or required to be viewed by employees.

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Video, audio and Flash Media objects must have synchronized text captions or text transcripts. R

7.2 Provide audio descriptions for all multimedia that contains essential visual information when it is provided to the public and/or required to be viewed by employees.

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Video, audio and Flash Media objects must have audio descriptions if the it contains essential visual information that is not discernable from the dialog or audio track. R

8. Animation

8.1 Provide a means of pausing any moving, blinking, scrolling, or auto-updating information.

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Video, audio, Flash Media objects should have controls to pause, play, stop and restart. R

8.2 Do not include content that flashes faster than 3 times per second.

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The blink and marquee elements must not be used. Blinking and moving text are an accessibility problems for people with photosenstive epilepsy and visual impairments. R

9. Links

9.1 Make sure that links are understandable out of context.

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Link text should be meaningful when taken out of context; therefore, links that point to different URIs should have different text contents. R

9.2 Provide a means of skipping past repetitive navigation links.

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The first link on a page should be a skip navigation link that contains the word "skip" and the href attribute should point to an internal destination. The skip navigation link should be visible to all users when the link has focus and must comply with other link rules. R

accesskey attribute values should be unique. D

accesskey attribute values should not interfere with Microsoft Internet Explorer menu shortcuts. D

9.3 Avoid using small links.

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An image that is the entire content of a link should be at least 16x16 pixels in size. R

The text content of a link should be at least 4 characters in length when rendered graphically. R

Small links should not be placed close together. R

9.4 Ensure that same-page links move keyboard focus as well as screen focus.

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The target of internal links need to include a tabindex attribute with the value set to "-1". This is required for Internet Explorer to move keyboard focus when the internal link is activated. R

10. Forms

10.1 Provide labels or titles for all form fields.

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The elements input[type="text | password | checkbox | radio | file"], select and textarea must have: label element content that has the label.for attribute referencing the id attribute of the form control element, or title attribute content on the form control element itself. R

The element input[type="image"] must have: alt attribute content on the form control element itself, or title attribute content on the form control element itself. R

The elements input[type="button" | submit | reset"] must have: value attribute content on the form control element itself, or title attribute content on the form control element itself. R

Each label and legend element must contain content that helps identify the purpose of the form control on the page. If the title attribute is defined for an input. select, textarea or button element, it must also contain content since it will be used by assistive technologies as part of the effective label for the form control. R

If a form control has an id attribute its value must be unique on the page. R

Each effective label within a page should be unique. D

Required form controls should have the word "required" as part of the effective label. D

Invalid form controls should have the word "invalid" as part of the effective label. D

When content of a form is validated as the user submits the form, a response page that provides a list of links with each link text describing the problem with each invalid form field should follow. D

When content of a form is validated as the user fills out each form field, an alert box must indicate if the input is invalid as the user tries to move the focus to the next form control. D

10.2 Provide legends for groups of form fields.

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10.3 Ensure that form fields are in a logical tab order.

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Ensure that form fields are in a logical tabbing order. R

10.4 Avoid placing non-focusable text between form fields.

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Text content that cannot receive the focus should not be placed between form controls. R

10.5 Ensure that text in form fields can be enlarged.

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The elements input, select, textarea and button should allow text size to change with the zoom setting of the browser. R

11. Tables

11.1 Identify a header cell for each column and row in simple data tables.

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Data tables must use th elements for header cells for the first cell in all the columns or rows. R

11.2 Identify relationships in complex data tables using id and headers attributes.

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Each th element in a complex data table must have ad id attribute whose value is unique relative to all ids on the page. R

Each td element in a complex data table must have a headers attribute that references the id attributes of associated th elements. R

11.3 Provide summary attributes for data tables.

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Each data table must have a nonempty summary attribute. R

The summary attribute value for each data table on a page should be unique. D

12. Frames

12.1 Provide concise, unique, and understandable titles for frames.

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Every frame element must have a title attribute must have content that describes the purpose of the frame. R

The title attribute content for each frame must be unique within a frameset. R

12.2 Avoid using hidden, empty, or non-essential frames.

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Hidden or empty frames should not be used. R

13. Scripts

13.1 Ensure that scripted functions are usable with assistive technologies.

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13.2 Ensure that significant interactions can be performed with both keyboard and mouse.

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Every onClick event handler should be on a focusable element. R

Every onmouseover event handler that is on a focusable element must have a corresponding onfocus event handler. R

Every onmouseout event handler that is on a focusable element must have a corresponding onblur event handler. R

Every onmouseover or onmouseout event handler that is not on a focusable element should use CSS :hover psuedo element to provide the stylistic changes. D

The functionality provided by onmousedown, onmouseup and onmousemove event handlers should have keyboard equivalents to perform the same functions that can be achieved with the mouse actions. R

13.3 Avoid changing focus unexpectedly.

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onChange event handler should not be used with the select element to cause a automatic change of focus or load a page. R

13.4 Avoid changing content unexpectedly.

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14. Embedded Objects

14.1 Use accessible embedded objects whenever possible.

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14.2 If an inaccessible object, applet, or plug-in must be used, provide an accessible alternative that includes the same content and functionality.

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15. Downloadable Documents

15.1 Provide natively accessible downloadable documents whenever possible.

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15.2 If a downloadable document cannot be made natively accessible, provide an accessible alternative that includes the same content and functionality.

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16. Timing

16.1 Notify users of time limits and provide a means to extend time if possible.

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16.2 Do not automatically refresh the current page.

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17. Page Layout

17.1 When using tables for layout, ensure that reading order is logical.

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When tables are used for layout, make sure the reading order makes sense when layout table markup is removed. R

17.2 When using style sheets for layout, ensure that reading order is logical.

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When CSS absolute positioning is used for layout, make sure the reading order makes sense when stylesheets are disabled. R

17.3 Avoid horizontal scrolling.

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18. Alternative Accessible Versions

18.1 Use separate accssible versions only as a last resort.

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